Alabama: Status Unclear Alabama law does not specifically mention hairbraiding, although it does include “weaving.” Braiding may fall within the definition of cosmetology. To become a licensed cosmetologist, aspiring braiders must pass an exam, as well as complete 1,200 credit hours (1,500 clock hours) of cosmetology training or 3,000 hours of a cosmetology apprenticeship over a three-year period. Source: Ala. Code § 34-7A-1(9), (12) (2005); Ala. Code § 34-7A-22(2) (2005). Alaska: Status Unclear Hairbraiding in Alaska may fall under the definition of hairdressing. To practice hairdressing, a braider is required to pass an exam and complete either 1,650 hours of coursework or 2,000 hours as an apprentice over a one- to two-year period. Source: Alaska Stat. § 08.13.220(6)(B) (2005); Alaska Stat. § 08.13.080(a)(2), (4), (6) (2005); Alaska Stat. § 08.13.082(b) (2005); Alaska Stat. § 08.13.090 (2005); Alaska Admin. Code tit. 12 § 09.090 (2005). Arizona: Braiders Free to Practice Arizona does not require hairbraiders to obtain a cosmetology license in order to practice braiding. In 2004, the Institute for Justice Arizona Chapter, on behalf of client Essence Farmer, won a legislative victory for all Arizona hairbraiders when the governor signed into law a statute exempting braiding entrepreneurs from the cosmetology license requirements. Source: Ariz. Rev. Stat. § 32-506(10) (2005). Arkansas: Status Unclear Arkansas law does not specifically mention hairbraiding, but the practice may fall under the definition of cosmetology. To obtain a cosmetology license, braiders must pass an exam and complete at least 1,500 hours of training. Source: Ark. Code § 17-26-102(b)(1) (2005); Ark. Code § 17-26-302 (2005); Ark. Code § 17-26-304(4) (2005). California: Braiders Free to Practice In California, braiders are exempt from cosmetology licensing laws. As long as African hairbraiders do not combine braiding with other practices—like chemical dyeing or straightening—they are free to practice their art without burdensome regulations. In 1999, the Institute for Justice, together with client Dr. JoAnne Cornwell, won this victory for California braiders after a court struck down a previous law requiring braiders to complete a long and expensive cosmetology course. Source: Cal. Bus. & Prof. Code § 7316(d)(2), (f) (2005). Colorado: Cosmetology License Required The state of Colorado requires hairbraiders to obtain a hairstyling or cosmetology license. The hairstyling license requires braiders to pass an exam and complete 1,140 clock hours of training; cosmetologists must pass an exam and complete 1,450 clock hours.† Source: Colo. Rev. Stat. § 12-8-103(9) & (9.7)(c) (2005); Colo. Rev. Stat. § 12-8-110 (2005); Colo. Rev. Stat. § 12-8-114(3) (2005); 4 Colo. Code Regs. § 731-1, Rule 7 (2005). † Effective July 1, 2006, hairstylists will need to show completion of a 40-credit course; cosmetologists will need to complete a 60-credit course. Connecticut: Braiders Free to Practice African hairbraiders in Connecticut are exempt from cosmetology and hairdressing licensing laws, leaving them free to work without unnecessary government regulations standing in the way. Connecticut does require a license for those who want to weave hair, but as long as braiders do not incorporate this technique they can freely practice their trade. Source: Conn. Gen. Stat. § 20-250(4) (2004), and as amended by 2005 Conn. ALS 272, sec. 11. Delaware: Status Unclear In Delaware, the law is unclear, but hairbraiding may require a cosmetology license. To obtain a cosmetology license, a braider must pass an exam and complete either 1,500 classroom hours (1,800 clock hours) of cosmetology training or 3,000 apprenticeship hours under a licensed cosmetologist. Source: Del. Code tit. 24 § 5101(4), (9) (2005); Del. Code tit. 24 § 5107(a) (2005). District of Columbia: Specialized Braiding License Required In Washington, D.C., hairbraiders may obtain a cosmetology specialty license in braiding. This license requires an exam and either 100 hours of training in a cosmetology school or equivalent training and experience. These requirements were put in place in 1992 in response to a lawsuit filed by the Institute for Justice on behalf of Taalib-Din Uqdah and Pamela Ferrell, owners of Cornrows & Co. But it took the Board over 10 years to adopt regulations to implement this change (during which braiding was legally practiced), with the regulations finally becoming fully effective only earlier this year. Source: D.C. Code § 47-2853.06(c) (2005); D.C. Mun. Reg. tit. 17, § 3702.1(c)(1) (2005); D.C. Mun. Reg. tit. 17, § 3703.9 (2005); 50 D.C. Reg. 7699 (Sept. 12, 2003). Florida: Specialized Braiding License Required Rather than require hairbraiders to obtain a cosmetology license that does not apply to their trade, Florida created a license specifically for hairbraiders. Unfortunately, Florida’s specialty license does not allow braiders to practice hair extending—a practice commonly employed by African hairbraiders—or weaving. Braiders in Florida must complete a 16-hour, 2-day health and sanitation course to become licensed, as well as pay a $25 biennial license fee. Source: Fla. Stat. ch. 477.013(9) (2005); Fla. Stat. ch. 477.0132 (2005); Fla. Admin. Code r. 61G5-24.019(1) to (2) (2005). Georgia: Braiders Free to Practice In response to complaints from local braiders, the Georgia legislature exempted hairbraiding from the definition of cosmetology in 2006. As long as braiders do not cut, singe or shampoo hair, they are free to practice. Source: S. 145, 148th Gen. Assem., Reg. Sess. (Ga. 2006). Hawaii: Status Unclear Hawaii law does not specifically mention hairbraiding, but braiders may still need to be licensed as a hairdresser or cosmetologist. Licensed hairdressers must pass an exam and complete either a 1,250-hour training course or a 2,500-hour apprenticeship. A cosmetology license requires an exam and either 1,800 hours of beauty school training or 3,600 hours of apprenticeship. Source: Haw. Rev. Stat. § 439-1 (2004); Haw. Rev. Stat. § 439-11 (2004); Haw. Rev. Stat. § 439-12 (b) & (c) (2004). Idaho: Status Unclear, Cosmetology License Likely Required In Idaho, hairbraiding is not specifically mentioned in the statute. But cosmetology students record the number of braiding operations performed in their record of instruction. Thus, it is likely that Idaho considers braiding to be part of cosmetology. To become a licensed cosmetologist, braiders are required to pass an exam and complete either a 2,000-hour course or a 4,000-hour apprenticeship. Source: Idaho Code § 54-802(1)(a) (2005); Idaho Admin. Code r. 24.04.01.500(.06)(a) (2005); Idaho Code § 54-805(1) (2005). Illinois: Cosmetology License Required In Illinois, hairbraiding is included in the definition of cosmetology. To earn a cosmetology license, braiders must pass an exam and finish a 1,500-hour cosmetology course. Source: 225 Ill. Comp. Stat. 410/3-1 (2005); 225 Ill. Comp. Stat. 410/3-2(1)(c) & (d) (2005). Indiana: Status Unclear, Cosmetology License Likely Required While not specifically mentioned in the statute, braiding is included in the cosmetology curriculum and is probably categorized as cosmetology. To become licensed as a cosmetologist, hairbraiders in Indiana must pass a test and take a 1,500-hour cosmetology course. Source: Ind. Code § 25-8-2-5(a)(1) (2005); Ind. Admin. Code tit. 820, r. 4-4-4(a) under “hairstyling” (2005); Ind. Code § 25-8-9-3(3) & (4) (2005); Ind. Code § 25-8-5-3(1) (2005). Iowa: Cosmetology License Required Iowa defines hairbraiding as cosmetology, thus requiring braiders to be licensed cosmetologists. Braiders must pass an exam and complete a 2,100-clock-hour cosmetology course (70 semester credit hours). Source: Iowa Code § 157.1(5)(a) (2004); Iowa Code § 157.3(1) (2004), as amended by 2005 Iowa ALS 89, sec. 24 (2005 Iowa House File 789); Iowa Code § 157.10(1) (2004). Kansas: Braiders Free to Practice Braiders in Kansas are exempt from cosmetology regulations. To qualify for exemption, braiders must fill out the “self-test” portion of a brochure on sanitation and keep the brochure and self-test available as a reference at their workplace. Source: Kan. Stat. § 65-1901(d)(2) (2004); Kan. Stat. § 65-1928 (2004). Kentucky: Status Unclear Although not specifically mentioned in the statute, in Kentucky hairbraiding may still be considered cosmetology. To obtain a cosmetology license, braiders must pass an exam, complete a 1,800-hour cosmetology course, and complete a six-month apprenticeship. Source: Kent. Rev. Stat. § 317A.010(2)(c) (2004); Kent. Rev. Stat. § 317A.050(1) & (2) (2004); Kent. Rev. Stat. § 317A.090(1) (2004). Louisiana: Specialized Braiding License Required Louisiana offers a specialized alternative hair design license for braiders. To obtain this license, braiders must take a 1,000-hour course and pass an exam. Source: La. Admin. Code tit. 46, § XXXI.101(A) (2005); La. Admin. Code tit. 46, § XXXI.1105(A) (2005); La. Admin. Code tit. 46, § XXXI.1107 (2005). Maine: Status Unclear While not explicitly listed, the state of Maine may consider hairbraiding to fall within the category of cosmetology. As cosmetologists, braiders are required to pass an exam and complete either a 1,500-hour cosmetology course or a 2,500-hour apprenticeship. Source: Maine Rev. Stat. tit. 32, § 14202(9)(D) & (E) (2004); Maine Rev. Stat. tit. 32, § 14226 (2004). Maryland: Braiders Free to Practice Braiders in Maryland are exempt from cosmetology licensing requirements, leaving them free to pursue their chosen careers. Source: Md. Code, Bus. Occ. & Prof. § 5-101(k)(2)(iii) (2005). Massachusetts: Status Unclear Although hairbraiding is not specifically mentioned in Massachusetts law, it may fall hairdressing. To earn a hairdressing license, braiders must first register with the state as an Operator. To register, a 1,000-hour course and an oral, written, and practical (“hands on”) test is required. A braider would then work for two years under supervision before being able to register as a hairdresser. Source: Mass. Gen. Laws ch. 112, §§ 87T, V, W (2005). Michigan: Braiders Free to Practice Michigan does not require a license to braid hair. However, a voluntary license to practice “natural hair cultivation” is available for braiders. This requires an exam, if available (otherwise, six months of practical experience), and either a 400-hour course or a six-month apprenticeship. Again, this specialized license is purely voluntary and is not required to braid hair in Michigan. Source: Mich. Comp. Laws § 339.1210a (2005); Mich. Comp. Laws § 339.1201(b), (m) & (n) (2005). Minnesota: Braiders Free to Practice Until recently, hairbraiding in Minnesota appeared to fall within the definition of cosmetology. Becoming a licensed cosmetologist required passing an exam and completing a 1,550-hour course. Due to the efforts of the Institute for Justice Minnesota Chapter and three Minnesota braiders, these restrictions have been lifted and braiders are free to work. An agreed order requires the Board to implement new regulations exempting braiders by April 20, 2006. Source: Minn. Stat. § 155A.03(2) (2005); Minn. R. 2105.0140(B) (2005); Minn. R. 2105.0150(A) (2005); 30 Minn. Reg. 449 (October 31, 2005). Mississippi: Braiders Free to Practice Hairbraiders in Mississippi are not required to have a cosmetology license. Instead, braiders must pay $25 to register with the Mississippi Department of Health, complete the “self-test” portion of a brochure on infection control techniques, and keep the brochure available at their workplace. In April 2005, the Institute for Justice won this freedom for African hairbraiders when Governor Haley Barbour signed House Bill #454 into law. Source: Miss. Code § 73-7-31(d) (2005); Miss. Code § 73-7-71 (2005). Missouri: Cosmetology License Required While the statute does not specifically mention hairbraiding, recent administrative hearings in Missouri have determined that braiding falls within the definition of cosmetology. To become licensed, braiders must pass an exam and complete one of the following: a 1,500-hour course, 1,220 hours of vocational instruction, or a 3,000-hour apprenticeship. Source: Mo. Rev. Stat. § 329.010(5)(a) (2005); State Bd. of Cosmetology v. Desouza, No. 04-1152, 2005 Mo. Admin. Hearings LEXIS 171, *8 (Sept. 23, 2005); Mo. Rev. Stat. § 329.050.1 (2005). Montana: Status Unclear, Cosmetology License Likely Required While hairbraiding is not specifically mentioned in the statue, Montana does list braiding in the cosmetology curriculum.† Thus it is likely that Montana will treat braiding as falling within the definition of hairdressing. A cosmetology license requires passing an exam and completing a 2,000-hour cosmetology course. Source: Mont. Code § 37-31-101(9)(a) (2005); Mont. Admin. R. 24.121.807(3)(a)(vi) (2005); Mont. Code § 37-31-304(3)(a) (2005). † Extending and weaving is also included in the barbering curriculum. Mont. Admin. R. 24.121.807(2)(a)(iv) (2005). Nebraska: Status Unclear, Cosmetology License Likely Required Despite the term not appearing in the statutory definition of cosmetology,† Nebraska appears to include hairbraiding in the cosmetology curriculum. To become licensed cosmetologists, braiders are required to pass an exam and complete a 2,100-hour course (2,000 credits) or apprenticeship. Source: Neb. Rev. Stat. § 71-351 (2005); Neb. Admin. Code tit. 172, § 36-012A (2005); Neb. Rev. Stat. § 71-387 (2005). † Hair weaving is included under the definition of barbering. Neb. Rev. Stat. § 71-202 (2005). Nevada: Status Unclear Although not specifically mentioned in the statute, hairbraiding in Nevada may fall under the definition of either cosmetology or hair designing.† Earning a cosmetology license requires a braider to take a test and complete either a 1,800-hour course or a 3,600-hour apprenticeship. Becoming a hair designer requires braiders to pass an exam and complete a 1,200-hour cosmetology course. Source: Nev. Rev. Stat. § 644.023(3) (2004); Nev. Rev. Stat. § 644.0277(3) (2004); Nev. Rev. Stat. § 644.200 (2004); Nev. Rev. Stat. § 644.204 (2004). † Hair weaving is included in the barbering definition. Nev. Rev. Stat. § 644.010(7) (2004). New Hampshire: Status Unclear Although hairbraiding is not specifically mentioned in the statute, New Hampshire may include hairbraiding within the definition of cosmetology. To become a licensed cosmetologist, braiders must pass an exam and complete either a 1,500-hour course or a 3,000-hour apprenticeship spanning at least two years. Source: N.H. Rev. Stat. § 313-A:1(VI) (2004); N.H. Rev. Stat. § 313-A:11(I) (2004). New Jersey: Status Unclear New Jersey law does not specifically mention hairbraiding, but it does include “hairweaving.” Braiding may fall under the definition of cosmetology. Braiders seeking a cosmetology-hairstyling license must pass an exam and complete either a 1,200-hour course from a licensed school of cosmetology and hairstyling or a vocational program offered through the public schools. Source: N.J. Rev. Stat. § 45:5B-3(j)(2) & (9) (2005); N.J. Rev. Stat.§ 45:5B-17 (2005). New Mexico: Status Unclear, Cosmetology License Likely Required While hairbraiding is not specifically mentioned in the statute, New Mexico regulations include hairbraiding within the cosmetology curriculum.† To earn a cosmetology license, braiders must pass an exam and complete a 1,600-hour course. Source: N.M. Stat. § 61-17A-4(A) (2005); N.M. Admin. Code § 16.34.8.15(C)(5)(m)–(p) (2005); N.M. Stat. § 61-17A-9 (2005). † Braiding is also included in the barbering curriculum. N.M. Admin. Code § 16.34.8.15(B)(5)(m)–(p) (2005). New York: Specialized Braiding License Required In New York, hairbraiders can obtain a specialty “natural hair styling” license by passing an exam and completing a 300-hour course of study. But many New York cosmetology schools do not offer the natural hair styling curriculum, making the license difficult to obtain. Source: N.Y. Gen. Bus. Law § 400(5) (2005); N.Y. Gen. Bus. Law § 406(2)(b) (2005); 19 N.Y. Comp. Codes R. & Regs. § 162.3(a) (2005). North Carolina: Braiders Free to Practice According to regulations adopted by the North Carolina State Board of Cosmetic Art Examiners, hairbraiders in North Carolina are considered “natural hair braiders” and do not need to obtain a cosmetology license. Braiders are free to work without unnecessary state regulation. When braiders provide any additional service included within the regulated field of cosmetic art—such as hair cutting or the application of dyes or chemicals—they are considered “natural hair stylists” and must obtain a cosmetology license. Source: N.C. Admin. Code tit. 21, r. 14A.0101(10) & (11) (2005). North Dakota: Status Unclear Although hairbraiding is not specifically mentioned in the statute, North Dakota may include braiding under the definition of cosmetology. Obtaining a cosmetology license requires passing an exam and completing a 1,800-hour course. Source: N.D. Cent. Code § 43-11-01(2) (2005); N.D. Cent. Code § 43-11-24 (2005); N.D. Cent. Code § 43-11-21 (2005); N.D. Cent. Code § 43-11-16(2) (2005). Ohio: Specialized Braiding License Required In Ohio, braiders can obtain a specialty “natural hair styling” license by passing an exam and completing a 450-hour hairbraiding course. But since its inception, only 21 braiders have earned the natural hair styling license. Source: Ohio Rev. Code § 4713.01 (2005); Ohio Rev. Code § 4713.24 (2005); Ohio Rev. Code § 4713.28(D) & (J) (2005). Oklahoma: Specialized Braiding License Required In Oklahoma, braiders can obtain a specialty “hairbraiding technician” license by passing an exam and completing either a 600-clock-hour course (20 credit hours) or a 1,200-hour apprenticeship under a licensed instructor. Source: Okla. Stat. tit. 59, § 199.1(11) (2005); Okla. Admin. Code § 175:10-9-25 (2004); Okla. Admin. Code § 175:10-3-43(b) (2004); Okla. Admin. Code § 175:10-9-2(a)(5) (2004); Okla. Stat. tit. 59, § 199.8 (2005). Oregon: Cosmetology License Required By Administrative Code, Oregon includes hairbraiding under hair design. Earning a hair design license involves passing an exam and completing 1,700 hours of training (1,450 in hair design + 250 in sanitation and career development). Source: Or. Rev. Stat. § 690.005(10) (2003); Or. Admin. R. 817-005-0005(37) (2005); Or. Rev. Stat. § 690.046 (2003); Or. Rev. Stat. § 345.400(3) (2003). Pennsylvania: Specialized Braiding License Required Pennsylvania created a natural hairbraiding license in 2006, requiring braiders to complete 300 hours of training plus an exam.† Braiders who can provide proof that they have continuously practice for the three year immediately proceeding implementation of the new license will be grandfathered in after completing only 150 hours of training (if they apply within one year of the board’s promulgation of the new natural hairbraiding regulations). Source: Cosmetology Law, as amended by S. 707, 2005 Reg. Sess. (Sept. 5, 2006) (to be codified at 63 Penn. Cons. Stat. § 507 et seq.); see also Diwara v. State Bd. of Cosmetology, 852 A.2d 1279, 1286 (Pa. Commw. 2004). † Hair weaving is also included in the definition of barbering. 63 Penn. Cons. Stat. § 552.1 (2005). Rhode Island: Status Unclear Although not specifically mentioned in Rhode Island statutes, hairbraiding may come under the definition of hairdressing or cosmetic therapy (which does include the term “weaving”). In order to obtain a hairdresser’s or cosmetician’s license, braiders must pass an exam and complete a 1,500-hour course. Source: R.I. Gen. Laws § 5-10-1(10) & (16) (2005); R.I. Gen. Laws § 5-10-8(a)(5) & (6) (2005); R.I. Gen. Laws § 5-10-9(1) (2005). South Carolina: Specialized Braiding License Required African hairbraiders in South Carolina can obtain a specialized braiding license. To earn this license, braiders must complete a six-hour health and sanitation class, pass an exam, and pay a $25 registration fee. Unfortunately, this specialty license specifically excludes the use of extensions or wefts, a practice commonly employed by hairbraiders. Braiders who wish to use extensions must complete the full cosmetology curriculum of 1,500 hours plus an exam.† Source: 2005 S.C. Senate Bill 509, to be codified at S.C. Code § 40-7-255 and S.C. Code § 40-7-20(2); S.C. Code § 40-13-230 (2004). † Hairbraiding is also included in the definition of barbering. 2005 S.C. Senate Bill 509, to be codified at S.C. Code § 40-7-255 and S.C. Code § 40-7-20(2). South Dakota: Cosmetology License Required South Dakota includes hairbraiding under the definition of cosmetology. To become licensed, braiders must pass an exam and complete either a 2,100-hour cosmetology course or a 3,000-hour apprenticeship. Source: S.D. Codified Laws § 36-15-2(1) (2005); S.D. Codified Laws § 36-15-19.1 (2005); S.D. Codified Laws § 36-15-17(2) (2005); S.D. Codified Laws § 36-15-45 (2005). Tennessee: Specialized Braiding License Required In Tennessee, hairbraiders can obtain a specialty “natural hair styling” license by passing a test and completing a 300-hour course.† Source: Tenn. Code § 62-4-102(a)(14) & (15) (2005); Tenn. Code § 62-4-110(f) (2005). † Hair weaving is also included in the definition of barbering. Tenn. Code § 62-3-105(6) (2005). Texas: Specialized Braiding License Required In Texas, braiding is included in the definition of cosmetology, but the Texas Commission of Licensing and Regulation has the power to create specialty licenses. As of June 14, 2006, the Commission offers a specialty certificate in braiding, so long as braiders do not shampoo, condition or dry hair or use glue when adding extensions. To obtain this certificate, braiders must complete a short 35-hour course. A hairweaving specialty license is also available, requiring an exam and a 300-hour course. Under Texas Occupations Code § 1602.002(b), the Commission has the power to exclude a service from the definition of cosmetology, i.e., the Commission has the authority to exempt braiders, but the Commission has not opted to do so. Source: Tex. Occ. Code § 1602.002(a)(2) (2005). Tex. Occ. Code § 1602.258 (2005); e-mail on file with the Institute for Justice (regulations for the new braiding specialty have not yet published); 22 Tex. Admin. Code § 89.31(b) (2005); 22 Tex. Admin. Code § 89.72(7) (2005); 22 Tex. Admin. Code § 89.15(i) (2005). † Hair weaving is also included in the definition of barbering. Tex. Occ. Code § 1601.002(1)(H) (2005). Utah: Status Unclear Although Utah’s statutory definition does not specifically mention hairbraiding, it does include “hair weaving.” Hairbraiding may likewise fall under the definition of cosmetology. To become a certified cosmetologist, braiders must pass an exam and complete either a 2,000-hour cosmetology course or a 2,500-hour apprenticeship. Source: Utah Code § 58-11a-102(21)(a) (2005); Utah Code § 58-11a-302(1) (2005); Utah Code § 58-11a-306(1) (2005). Vermont: Status Unclear Although not specifically mentioned in the statute, hairbraiding in Vermont may be included in the definition of cosmetology. Braiders seeking a cosmetology license must pass an exam and complete either a 1,500-hour course or a 2,000-hour apprenticeship. Source: Vt. Stat. tit. 26, § 271(3)(A) (2005); Vt. Stat. tit. 26, § 283 (2005); Vt. Stat. tit. 26, § 278 (2005); Vt. Code R. 04-030-030(3.2) & (3.6) (Weil 2005). Virginia: Specialized Braiding License Required Virginia considers hairbraiding to be a part of cosmetology. However, the state offers an alternative “hair braider” license.† To obtain this specialized license, braiders must complete a 170-hour course and pass an exam. Source: Va. Code § 54.1-700 (2005); 20 Va. Regs. Reg. 2639 to 2646 (July 26, 2004), to be codified at 18 Va. Admin. Code § 41-30-10 et seq. † The emergency regulation providing for the hairbraiding license expired June 30, 2005, but as of the date of this report, the regulation remains posted on the website for the Virginia Department of Professional and Occupational Regulation. Washington: Braiders Free to Practice Braiders in Washington used to be considered cosmetologists, thus subject to an examination plus a 1,600-hour course or apprenticeship. But the Institute for Justice Washington Chapter—on behalf of African hairbraider Benta Diaw—was able to persuade the state’s department of licensing to abandon its unnecessary regulations for braiders. According to an Interpretive Statement filed in 2005 by the Washington State Department of Licensing, hairbraiders are no longer required to have a cosmetology license to braid hair. Source: Wash. Rev. Code § 18.16.020(6) (2005); Wash. Rev. Code § 18.16.100(1)(b) & (c) (2005); Wash. St. Reg. 05-04-013 (January 24, 2005). West Virginia: Status Unclear African hairbraiding in West Virginia appears may fall under the definition of beauty culture/cosmetology. To earn a beautician/cosmetologist license, braiders must pass an exam and complete 2,000 hours of instruction at a licensed beauty school . Source: W. Va. Code § 16-14-2 (2005); W. Va. Code § 30-27-3 (2005); W. Va. Code St. R. § 3-1-4.1 (2005); W. Va. Code St. R. § 3-1-6.1 (2005). Wisconsin: Status Unclear; Cosmetology License Likely Not Required Although not specifically mentioned in the Wisconsin statute, hairbraiding may fall under the category of cosmetology . While the board has not issued a written statement of its position, staff members verbally informed IJ attorneys that braiding did not require a license at the current time. To become a licensed cosmetologist, braiders would need to pass an exam and complete a 1,800-hour cosmetology course or 4,000-hour apprenticeship (including 288 hours of classroom instruction). Source: Wis. Stat. § 454.01(5)(a) (2005); Wis. Stat. § 454.06(2) (2005); Wis. Stat. § 454.10 (2005). Wyoming: Cosmetology License Required Hairbraiding is not specifically mentioned in Wyoming statutes, but administrative rules include braiding within the definition of cosmetology. Braiders seeking a cosmetology license must pass an exam and complete a 2,000-hour course. In 2005, Wyoming amended its Cosmetology Act to allow for individualized licensing as a hair stylist, requiring only 1,250 hours. Source: Wyo. Stat. § 33-12-120(a)(v) and (ix) (2005); Code Wy. R. § 006-033-001, § 7 (Weil 2005); Wyo. Stat. § 33-12-130 (2005); Code Wy. R. § 006-033-006, §§ 1 & 2 (Weil 2005).